Invisible Knowledge

Amy Tuttle

Accessibility, Data, Devices, Digital Archiving, Locative Media, News, Pedagogy, Social Media

Screenshots show that "trump meme" is the top result.

Since you’re reading this online publication, I imagine that you, like me, leave hundreds of digital traces every day. A lot of these traces are things we can see–things like emails, texts, blog posts, twitter posts, photographs, Youtube comments, or Facebook likes. But today I’m particularly interested in the invisible, unintentional digital traces we leave–things like records of our internet searches and website visits, or the location data that logs our movements and phone calls. There’s knowledge in the invisible

#TBT: Multimediating

Amy Tuttle

Audio Week, History, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

Black and white picture of a little girl wearing big headphones, looking like she's screaming.

In today’s #TBT post, we showcase an episode of the DWRL’s rhet/tech podcast Zeugma. “Multimediating” considers the productive forms of risk and failure that come with introducing audio assignments into university writing courses. In the episode, Dr. Rita Raley, Associate Professor of English at the University of California-Santa Barbara, talks to our staff about tactical media and digital activism. Ryan Trauman and Harley Ferris explore ways of incorporating audio assignments into undergraduate rhetoric and composition courses. And various members of

Accessible Data for Austin

Amy Tuttle

Accessibility, Data, Digital Archiving, Locative Media

Star Trek's Data standing in front of the Austin skyline.

The various features of built environments can allow us to access the spaces in which we conduct our everyday lives. But for some individuals, the very same features that are meant to provide access to spaces render these spaces out of reach. Barriers in public environments often prevent mobility-impaired people from being able to move and participate freely within a space. In the space of a college campus, for example, many individuals face the challenges of navigating barriers like a

Re/Constructing Monopoly

Amy Tuttle

Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

The corner of a Monopoly gameboard showing the space "Boardwalk," which is a high value property in the game. The space also has a hotel on it, which indicates that it is a lucrative property. Behind the plastic, red hotel is a small metal car gamepiece.

In “Low Fidelity in High Definition: Speculations on Rhetorical Editions,” Casey Boyle presents methodological variations between critical editions and rhetorical editions. Notably, he examines how different scholars view fidelity, suggesting that traditional literary scholars tend to emphasize textual authenticity, while rhetoricians are most interested in foregrounding rhetorical effects. Specifically Boyle says, “as rhetoricians we are not as interested in what a text is as we are in what a text does” (127). Because they open spaces for conversation that can

Writing By Design

Amy Tuttle

Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

The most obvious connection between writing and design is communication. Graphic designers communicate through visual elements, and writers communicate through the written word. Although they make use of different tools, essentially they both foreground methods that bring about an exchange of information. But can learning graphic design help us understand something about writing?

(Un)Dead Links

Amy Tuttle

Digital Archiving

What good is a dead link? Maybe a dead link is no good at all. After all, the functionality of links lies at the very core of the internet’s navigability. A live link is a path to content; it is a means for users to access the content of a target page to which the jump command is “linked.” These navigable links are more or less solely responsible for the rapid growth of the World Wide Web.