Roundtable Interview with Dr. Jim Brown

Matt Breece

Alumni, Events

Jim Brown sitting at a table behind a laptop computer, looking to his right with a joyful smile.

As part of the DWRL’s first Alumni Network Event, the Lab hosted a roundtable interview with Dr. Jim Brown on March 30, 2017. The roundtable was led by Program Coordinator Will Burdette, and joined by Assistant Director Sarah Frank and Staffer Sarah Welsh. In this roundtable interview, Dr. Brown reflects on how his time as a graduate student in the DWRL prepared him for a career in digital rhetorics and to direct the Digital Studies Center at Rutgers University-Camden, as

Lesson Plan: Visualizing and Analyzing Terministic Screens with Voyant

Matt Breece

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

When instructors teach rhetorical or textual analysis that focuses on how word choice frames arguments and how audiences might interpret texts, it often relies on a singular text with an assignment that asks students to analyze how the author’s choice of words, terms, or metaphors influence its interpretation. Yet this type of analysis is limited because it doesn’t account for how word choice excludes other words, thus affecting a text’s interpretation. As Kenneth Burke reminds us in “Terministic Screens”: “Even

“Doing Digital Visual Studies” with Laurie Gries

Matt Breece

Data, Events, Tools

Dr. Laurie Gries speaking at a lectern

As part of our spring 2017 Speaker Series, the Digital Writing & Research Lab hosted Dr. Laurie Gries, whose lecture “Doing Digital Visual Studies” reflects upon and extends the research she undertook in her award-winning book Still Life with Rhetoric: A New Materialist Approach for Visual Rhetorics. In her longitudinal study of Shepard Fairey’s “Obama Hope,” she developed a digital, visual methodology called iconographic tracking in order “to trace the circulation, transformation, and consequentiality of new media images.” Dr. Gries’s

Ethical Design and Time Well Spent

Matt Breece

Accessibility, Devices

Diagonal matrix with rows and columns of mobile phones with different social media icons like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

The amount of time we spend engaged with our digital devices, especially our smart phones, doesn’t necessarily make us feel more empowered. The organization Time Well Spent argues that the reason for this isn’t some moral failing on the part of users but rather a question of intentional design: “Many people think our devices are neutral and it’s up to us to choose how to use them. But that’s not all true. Attention companies (like Snapchat, Facebook or Netflix) spend