Nov 16: A Pedagogy Talk with Clay Spinuzzi, “Putting Together RHE 328: Writing for Entrepreneurs.”

Matt Breece

Events

Stacks of post-it notes next to crumpled post-its

The DWRL is excited to host a Pedagogy Talk with Clay Spinuzzi on Friday, November 16 from 12-1:30 pm in Par 102. As part of an ongoing pedagogy series in coordination with the Department of Rhetoric and Writing, Dr. Spinuzzi will be discussing RHE 328—an open-topic upper-division course that introduces professional and technical writing topics to liberal arts majors. In this presentation, Dr. Spinuzzi will discuss how he developed one such topic—writing for entrepreneurs—based on his own research. He’ll discuss teaching philosophy, learning objectives,

October 19: “Access Designed,” a Pedagogy Talk with Casey Boyle

Matt Breece

Events

Standard keyboard with accessibility icons replacing standard keyboard letters

The DWRL is excited to host a Pedagogy Talk with Casey Boyle on Friday, October 19 from 12-1:30 pm in Par 102. As part of an ongoing pedagogy series in coordination with the Department of Rhetoric and Writing, Dr. Boyle will be discussing an undergraduate course he is developing for the Spring 2019 semester. Access Designed is a course that will instruct students to communicate ethically by considering how to design communication using technology to address the needs of audiences with different abilities.

Lesson Plan: Analyzing and (Re)Performing Vocality

Matt Breece

Lesson Plans

As rhetoric and composition instructors, we typically have students work with written texts, both in analysis and in production. While we might ask students to answer questions about tone and prosody in written texts, often their analyses remained confined to stylistic concerns without attending to questions of delivery. What gets overlooked in this assignment mainstay is the possibility of analyzing oral texts for delivery, affect, and vocality. Yet Erin Anderson notes that with contemporary mediated technologies, “this notion of voice-as-effect becomes

Lesson Plan: Visualizing Sound by Captioning Nonspeech Sounds

Matt Breece

Lesson Plans

Although closed-captioning is usually thought of in terms of accessibility, it also highlights the larger rhetorical significance of sound—a significance which is most notably taken up in sound studies. The convergence of rhetoric with sound studies has become increasingly salient to rhetorical theory as noted in the review essay “Auscultating Again: Rhetoric and Sound Studies” from RSQ. Sound in the multimodal classroom has likewise become a relevant site for rhetorical instruction, invention, and exploration. Scholars like Cynthia Selfe, Erin Anderson,

Roundtable Interview with Dr. Jim Brown

Matt Breece

Alumni, Events

Jim Brown sitting at a table behind a laptop computer, looking to his right with a joyful smile.

As part of the DWRL’s first Alumni Network Event, the Lab hosted a roundtable interview with Dr. Jim Brown on March 30, 2017. The roundtable was led by Program Coordinator Will Burdette, and joined by Assistant Director Sarah Frank and Staffer Sarah Welsh. In this roundtable interview, Dr. Brown reflects on how his time as a graduate student in the DWRL prepared him for a career in digital rhetorics and to direct the Digital Studies Center at Rutgers University-Camden, as

Lesson Plan: Visualizing and Analyzing Terministic Screens with Voyant

Matt Breece

Lesson Plans

When instructors teach rhetorical or textual analysis that focuses on how word choice frames arguments and how audiences might interpret texts, it often relies on a singular text with an assignment that asks students to analyze how the author’s choice of words, terms, or metaphors influence its interpretation. Yet this type of analysis is limited because it doesn’t account for how word choice excludes other words, thus affecting a text’s interpretation. As Kenneth Burke reminds us in “Terministic Screens”: “Even

“Doing Digital Visual Studies” with Laurie Gries

Matt Breece

Data, Events, Tools

Dr. Laurie Gries speaking at a lectern

As part of our spring 2017 Speaker Series, the Digital Writing & Research Lab hosted Dr. Laurie Gries, whose lecture “Doing Digital Visual Studies” reflects upon and extends the research she undertook in her award-winning book Still Life with Rhetoric: A New Materialist Approach for Visual Rhetorics. In her longitudinal study of Shepard Fairey’s “Obama Hope,” she developed a digital, visual methodology called iconographic tracking in order “to trace the circulation, transformation, and consequentiality of new media images.” Dr. Gries’s

Ethical Design and Time Well Spent

Matt Breece

Accessibility, Devices

Diagonal matrix with rows and columns of mobile phones with different social media icons like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

The amount of time we spend engaged with our digital devices, especially our smart phones, doesn’t necessarily make us feel more empowered. The organization Time Well Spent argues that the reason for this isn’t some moral failing on the part of users but rather a question of intentional design: “Many people think our devices are neutral and it’s up to us to choose how to use them. But that’s not all true. Attention companies (like Snapchat, Facebook or Netflix) spend