#TBT: Multimediating

Amy Tuttle

Audio Week, History, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

Black and white picture of a little girl wearing big headphones, looking like she's screaming.

In today’s #TBT post, we showcase an episode of the DWRL’s rhet/tech podcast Zeugma. “Multimediating” considers the productive forms of risk and failure that come with introducing audio assignments into university writing courses. In the episode, Dr. Rita Raley, Associate Professor of English at the University of California-Santa Barbara, talks to our staff about tactical media and digital activism. Ryan Trauman and Harley Ferris explore ways of incorporating audio assignments into undergraduate rhetoric and composition courses. And various members of

Cool Tools: Sound Mapping

shaherzadahmadi

Assignments, Audio Week, Locative Media, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy, Tools

Screenshot from UMapper

Jazz began in New Orleans at the turn of the century and spread like wildfire in the 1920s, as men and women who perfected the genre booked gigs in Austin, Chicago, and New York. Musicians played live for youthful audiences, electrified by the new sound. As the genre traveled north, and later west, it transformed from Louis Armstrong’s optimistic trumpet to Thelonious Monk’s volatile piano solos. How may instructors demonstrate these changes in America’s cultural landscape, capturing both the physical

Workshop Recap: Audio Recording and Editing

andrewheermans

Audio Week, Events

Will Burdette, Lab Coordinator, leads the workshop on audio recording, in Parlin Hall 102.

Last Friday, The DWRL hosted one of its bi-weekly digital literacy workshops, where staff members can increase their digital literacy and ascertain useful skills for the digital world we live in. This last week’s workshop circled around audio: from genres of audio, strategies for using audio, finding audio that is usable (and legal), and of course recording hardware and editing software. The Lab’s Coordinator and resident audio expert, Will Burdette ran the workshop, and led the attendees through both a

Audio: Avital Ronell’s Digital Traces

Reinhard Mueller

Audio Week, Digital Archiving, Events

This is a picture of Avital Ronell in a speaking gesture with her right arm, spreading her four fingers and holding a blue pen with her thumb. She is standing in fron of two computer screens. Behind here is a dark wall. She is looking into the camera and is wearing black rectangular glasses. She has red lipstick and a red ribbon in her her. Her hair is mainly black, and she wears a black jacket with a white-red blouse.

With new digital forms of communication, we face new forms of writing, new forms of signs and texts, of producing always new kinds of what Jacques Derrida calls “traces” in our world. The human being is no longer a spirited entity that produces sublime speech, but we are products of manifold traces that in turn leave a myriad of traces behind. How, then, does technology change our ways of communicating, our ways of thinking, our ways of existing? Does humanity