Lesson Plan: viewing>writing>listening Pedagogical Versions of Access

Sierra Mendez

Accessibility, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans

Existentially, this lesson plan is about challenging student conceptions of information dissemination and questioning notions of universality embedded in web narratives of access. We like to think of the internet as a democratic space of unlimited maneuverability. But for many users, it is not. Here, we want students to consider the overwhelming prominence of visual, picture-based knowledge and ask who is excluded? Who cannot move freely in this space? Who is not granted access? Effectively, this assignment asks students to

Lesson Plan: Infographics – Digital, Visual Stories

Sierra Mendez

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

Image source: www.the-digital-reader.com. Image source: www.the-digital-reader.com. Both infographics and data visualization are tools to visually represent data. They make it easier for audiences to grasp difficult concepts by communicating meaning through a visual summary. It is the level of narration where the forms diverge: data visualization will employ algorithms to directly represent vast quantities of data and make interpretation simpler, whereas infographics are constructed by a human to tell a story about the data–to summarize its context, its meaning, and

Lesson Plan: Transforming Data Visualizations

Mac Scott

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

Contemporary rhetorical theory privileges a view of rhetoric as dynamic, where texts circulate both spatially and temporally to myriad effects. For instance, in her influential article “Unframing Models of Public Distribution,” Jenny Rice pushes against a view of rhetoric as contained and static, arguing instead that the “rhetorical situation is part of . . . an ongoing social flux” and that rhetorics “evolve in aparallel ways” (9, 14) as they circulate. Mary Queen, in “Transnational Feminist Rhetorics in a Digital

Lesson Plan: Visualizing and Analyzing Terministic Screens with Voyant

Matt Breece

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

When instructors teach rhetorical or textual analysis that focuses on how word choice frames arguments and how audiences might interpret texts, it often relies on a singular text with an assignment that asks students to analyze how the author’s choice of words, terms, or metaphors influence its interpretation. Yet this type of analysis is limited because it doesn’t account for how word choice excludes other words, thus affecting a text’s interpretation. As Kenneth Burke reminds us in “Terministic Screens”: “Even

Visualizing Data with Google Maps

DWRL Staff

Accessibility, Data, Data Visualisation Week, Digital Archiving, Locative Media

A picture of a map of an unidentified space with a large red pin marker stuck in the center of the map's area.

Visualization: Sierra Mendez. Text: Amy Tuttle. It’s hard to believe that at one time, map ownership was a privilege reserved for the wealthiest members of a society. But thanks to modern surveying techniques and satellite systems, highly precise maps are widely available on the internet. As a result of this ubiquity, maps have become absolutely critical in many fields of human endeavor. With a few clicks of a mouse, Google Maps will allow you to explore the earth, the moon,

Cool Tools: Tableau

shaherzadahmadi

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Pedagogy, Tools

Tableau map made by the author with the title Does Rising Tuition Influence the Degrees Students Seek?

Last Friday, the DWRL hosted another workshop in preparation for the digitally accessible map we plan to create for our diverse student body. In conjunction with a discussion of collecting and analyzing data, Amy Tuttle provided an excellent lesson on Tableau, an online service that allows users to re-present data in creative ways, like this visualization of the relationship between the numbers of students enrolled and doctoral degrees earned by Reinhard Mueller, one of our staff members.

Affectively Interactive

Mac Scott

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

A silver keyboard with the image of a red treble clef on top of it.

One of my favorite data visualizations concerns the Beatles. Created by Adam McCann from Dueling Data, the graphic, amongst other things, lets the user hover their computer cursor over illustrations of band members to see how many hit songs those members have written and when. I find the visualization memorable, no doubt, because I find the content interesting (e.g., the Lennon/McCartney duo falls off toward the end), but the graphic seems to resonate beyond that. This partly has to do

Adobe Creatives: What’s the Difference?

Sierra Mendez

Data Visualisation Week, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy, Tools

We are interrupting our usual broadcast of highly-fluent research narratives and pedagogical concerns to address an issue of practical import. Many curriculums now require a segment on visual literacy and infographic assessment (understandably, with the daily assault of information-rich images on web and other media sources), but this is quite a challenge for instructors who may feel shaky about making visual media. For anyone looking to introduce infographics in a way that incorporates Adobe Creative Suite or anyone who just

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Teaching Data Visualization: An Introduction

DWRL Staff

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

A word cloud made with the 200 most common words in this post

Team Data Visualization is proud to present a set of lesson plans that are ready to use in your classroom (networked or not). Whether you’ve been thinking about introducing a data visualization lesson of some kind, or have no idea what that would even look like or how it would fit in a writing classroom (or any classroom for that matter), we’ve got you covered. We’ve designed this set of lesson plans to be cohesive, but you can pick any

Lesson Plan: Navigating Research with Mind Maps

Sierra Mendez

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

Typically, when we think about data visualization, we think about a product–an infographic or chart that helps viewers understand and engage with complex information. Today, we’re doing something a little different and thinking about visualization as a tool for students to identify relationships and patterns in their research. We’ll start by introducing MindMup, a digital mindmapping tool, and present a basic how-to for its use. We are then going to use MindMup as a way to uncover relationships. Usually, mindmaps