Invisible Knowledge

Amy Tuttle

Accessibility, Data, Devices, Digital Archiving, Locative Media, News, Pedagogy, Social Media

Screenshots show that "trump meme" is the top result.

Since you’re reading this online publication, I imagine that you, like me, leave hundreds of digital traces every day. A lot of these traces are things we can see–things like emails, texts, blog posts, twitter posts, photographs, Youtube comments, or Facebook likes. But today I’m particularly interested in the invisible, unintentional digital traces we leave–things like records of our internet searches and website visits, or the location data that logs our movements and phone calls. There’s knowledge in the invisible

Data Visualization: Visualizing Sound Texts

Ansley Colclough

Data, Multimodal Writing

     In an upcoming lesson plan, I introduce some ways in which visualization be used to analyze elements of a literary text such as genre, theme, motifs, or plot structure. However, that lesson plan focuses predominantly on visual works. What are some of the ways in which visualization could be used to explore sound compositions, such as music?       Visualizing audio texts allows students in literature classes to convey information without requiring a background in musical theory.

Lesson Plan: Narrative Numbers

DWRL Staff

Data, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy, Tools

By Sierra Mendez & Sarah Welsh Maybe we can begin by blaming Plato for his view that math, specifically geometry, was the one perfect truth in the world–a belief systematically strengthened by science’s insistent reliance on empirical, numerical data as “truth.” These notions have been adopted into the public conscious, leaving people with the tendency to treat quantitative evidence as unquestionable facts that are above argument. Most students tend to say things like “numbers speak for themselves” when instead they

Lesson Plan: Visualizing and Analyzing Texts with Voyant

Ansley Colclough

Data, Pedagogy, Tools

In writing and literature classes, we teach our students to gather evidence from close reading in order to support their arguments. In what ways could data visualization charts actually aid processes of reading? The visualization tool Voyant allows the user to track the relative appearance and context of specific words and phrases in a specific body of text, from a poem to an entire corpus. While digital tool analysis by no means replaces close reading, it can be useful for

Lesson Plan: Photography, Photoshop, and Visual Rhetoric

DWRL Staff

Data, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy, Tools

By Sierra Mendez & Sarah Welsh This data visualization lesson plan focuses on image manipulation across a variety of sources. It matters to us and to the classroom because 21st century forms of media and knowledge dissemination demand that we be able to interpret and utilize visual forms of information. Photos are a key component of modern data visualization whether they make up the data itself or are integrated into an infographic. An acknowledgement and understanding of how photos are

(Re)visualizing Data

DWRL Staff

Assignments, Data, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy, Tools

Stylistic data visualization similar to snow on a TV screen but with no accompanying data

Team Data Visualization is proud to present a new set of lesson plans that we’ve designed to be as cohesive as the first. With a little planning, anyone can share a data visualization lesson plan with their students. Sarah Welsh and Sierra Mendez collaborated on two lesson plans. The first takes inspiration from Dr. Johanna Wolfe and her work on rhetorical numbers to help students think about the often mistaken view that numbers always equal fact. The second provides a meditation on rhetorical

Teaching Wearables and Metadata: An Introduction

DWRL Staff

Data, Devices, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

An image of words jumbled together, with some words emboldened and enlarged. The largest bold word is "Metadata," which is the focus of the artwork. Other words hat are large and bold include "information," "definitions," and "systems".

This semester, Team Wearables is committed to providing faculty interested in digital rhetoric and pedagogy with lesson plans that get at the heart of academic issues surrounding the proliferation of wearable devices. Our first set of lessons this semester focuses on one particularly salient issue concerning the examination of wearable technology today: metadata. Metadata isn’t a recent phenomenon. The Dewey Decimal System creates metadata so that the books, journals, and periodicals we need are easier to find in our libraries.

Lesson Plan: Wearable Tech and Metadata

J Brentlinger

Data, Devices, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

These modules introduce the importance of ‘metadata’ to undergraduate students. They create a necessary link between metadata and contemporary ‘Wearable Tech’. Understanding how metadata is created and used helps students realize the ramifications of its existence, including its influence on the process of digital writing. Learning Objectives One class period, but the lesson is modulated to fit into already existing lessons as the instructor wishes The articles listed, the link to Project ‘Seen’, a computer and smartphone None The lesson

Rhetorical Numbers: A Workshop with Dr. Joanna Wolfe

Sierra Mendez

Alumni, Data, Events, Pedagogy

A variety of colored graphs on a white background

Across public and social media, there is a tendency to treat quantitative evidence as facts that are above argument. Most students, indeed most people, tend to say things like “numbers speak for themselves” when instead they should ask, “what are these numbers being used to say and how?” The University of Texas recently hosted a lecture and workshop with Dr. Joanna Wolfe, Professor and Director of the Global Communications Center and at Carnegie-Mellon University. A graduate of UT’s Department of

Visualizing Data with Google Maps

DWRL Staff

Accessibility, Data, Data Visualisation Week, Digital Archiving, Locative Media

A picture of a map of an unidentified space with a large red pin marker stuck in the center of the map's area.

Visualization: Sierra Mendez. Text: Amy Tuttle. It’s hard to believe that at one time, map ownership was a privilege reserved for the wealthiest members of a society. But thanks to modern surveying techniques and satellite systems, highly precise maps are widely available on the internet. As a result of this ubiquity, maps have become absolutely critical in many fields of human endeavor. With a few clicks of a mouse, Google Maps will allow you to explore the earth, the moon,