Visualizing Data with Google Maps

DWRL Staff

Accessibility, Data, Data Visualisation Week, Digital Archiving, Locative Media

A picture of a map of an unidentified space with a large red pin marker stuck in the center of the map's area.

Visualization: Sierra Mendez. Text: Amy Tuttle. It’s hard to believe that at one time, map ownership was a privilege reserved for the wealthiest members of a society. But thanks to modern surveying techniques and satellite systems, highly precise maps are widely available on the internet. As a result of this ubiquity, maps have become absolutely critical in many fields of human endeavor. With a few clicks of a mouse, Google Maps will allow you to explore the earth, the moon,

Cool Tools: Tableau

shaherzadahmadi

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Pedagogy, Tools

Tableau map made by the author with the title Does Rising Tuition Influence the Degrees Students Seek?

Last Friday, the DWRL hosted another workshop in preparation for the digitally accessible map we plan to create for our diverse student body. In conjunction with a discussion of collecting and analyzing data, Amy Tuttle provided an excellent lesson on Tableau, an online service that allows users to re-present data in creative ways, like this visualization of the relationship between the numbers of students enrolled and doctoral degrees earned by Reinhard Mueller, one of our staff members.

Affectively Interactive

Mac Scott

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

A silver keyboard with the image of a red treble clef on top of it.

One of my favorite data visualizations concerns the Beatles. Created by Adam McCann from Dueling Data, the graphic, amongst other things, lets the user hover their computer cursor over illustrations of band members to see how many hit songs those members have written and when. I find the visualization memorable, no doubt, because I find the content interesting (e.g., the Lennon/McCartney duo falls off toward the end), but the graphic seems to resonate beyond that. This partly has to do

2

Teaching Data Visualization: An Introduction

DWRL Staff

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

A word cloud made with the 200 most common words in this post

Team Data Visualization is proud to present a set of lesson plans that are ready to use in your classroom (networked or not). Whether you’ve been thinking about introducing a data visualization lesson of some kind, or have no idea what that would even look like or how it would fit in a writing classroom (or any classroom for that matter), we’ve got you covered. We’ve designed this set of lesson plans to be cohesive, but you can pick any

Lesson Plan: Navigating Research with Mind Maps

Sierra Mendez

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

Typically, when we think about data visualization, we think about a product–an infographic or chart that helps viewers understand and engage with complex information. Today, we’re doing something a little different and thinking about visualization as a tool for students to identify relationships and patterns in their research. We’ll start by introducing MindMup, a digital mindmapping tool, and present a basic how-to for its use. We are then going to use MindMup as a way to uncover relationships. Usually, mindmaps

Lesson Plan: Visual Literacy and Infographic (Re)Composition

Mac Scott

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

In Multiliteracies for a Digital Age, Stuart Selber discusses the importance of pedagogy that cultivates, what he refers to as, multiliteracies, where students strive to be “users of technology . . . questioners of technology . . . producers of technology” (25). This idea of multiliteracies pushes beyond a focus on teaching students the technical functions of technology (though that still has a place) to emphasize that students also need to hone their rhetorical and critical capacities. Working with visual

Lesson Plan: Data Collection and Database Rhetorics

Sarah Welsh

Assignments, Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

Some public data makes sense , and some data does not. Not only does this have to do with the way data is presented or cherry picked, but research suggests that in order to get credible results, surveys should provide clear questions that are unambiguous, unbiased, and worded in a way that prompts respondents to answer truthfully (Dillman 2007). This might seem obvious when it’s written down as it is here, but the importance of a survey’s rhetoric may not

Accessible Data for Austin

Amy Tuttle

Accessibility, Data, Digital Archiving, Locative Media

Star Trek's Data standing in front of the Austin skyline.

The various features of built environments can allow us to access the spaces in which we conduct our everyday lives. But for some individuals, the very same features that are meant to provide access to spaces render these spaces out of reach. Barriers in public environments often prevent mobility-impaired people from being able to move and participate freely within a space. In the space of a college campus, for example, many individuals face the challenges of navigating barriers like a