Lesson Plan: Wearable Tech and Metadata

J Brentlinger

Data, Devices, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

These modules introduce the importance of ‘metadata’ to undergraduate students. They create a necessary link between metadata and contemporary ‘Wearable Tech’. Understanding how metadata is created and used helps students realize the ramifications of its existence, including its influence on the process of digital writing. Learning Objectives One class period, but the lesson is modulated to fit into already existing lessons as the instructor wishes The articles listed, the link to Project ‘Seen’, a computer and smartphone None The lesson

Lesson Plan: Data, Privacy and Identity on Facebook

Reinhard Mueller

Devices, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

In “Information Revelation and Internet Privacy Concerns on Social Network Sites: A Case Study of Facebook” (2009), Alyson Young and Anabel Quan-Haase argued that “despite concerns raised about the disclosure of personal information on social network sites, research has demonstrated that users continue to disclose personal information.” In recent years, Facebook has expanded greatly — both in user numbers and in their range of applications, especially those available for mobile technologies. Used on wearable devices like smartphones and smart watches,

Lesson Plan: Thyncing about Technology & Emotion

andrewheermans

Devices, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy, Social Media

Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) has been accepted within medical fields as an effective and safe form of treatment for depression, anxiety and insomnia. Recently, there have been multiple personal-use devices released that appropriate these neuroscientific findings and are being marketed as a way of combating stress, anxiety and insomnia that is safer and more effective than prescription medication or substance use (coffee, alcohol etc). Thync is the first such device that is wearable, portable and controlled through an iOS app,

Wearable Technology: Rhetoric, Habit and the Apple Watch

andrewheermans

Devices

For the past few weeks, I have been wearing an Apple Watch, in an effort to survey the efficacy and implications of wearable technologies. Devices whose “primary functionality requires that they be connected to bodies” (Gouge & Jones, 201), have become the object of study and criticism within the field of rhetorical studies, as they are argued to exist “between media you carry, and media you become”, while integrating a computer “with one’s physical, political, social, and ontological makeup” (Gouge

Augmented Reality Has Arrived and It’s Ready to Be Analyzed! Well, Almost.

Sarah A. Riddick

Accessibility, Devices, Locative Media

Lately, augmented reality has been making a lot of headlines in the tech world. This week, for instance, Microsoft revealed its HoloLens, a visual headset that allows people to interact with and manipulate complex, projected visuals. In a promo for the HoloLens, a woman wearing the headset customizes a Volvo car before buying it, building it up from the nuts and bolts with gestures as simple as pressing her thumb and forefinger together. It isn’t quite the tech we see Robert

Augmented Reality and Smartphones: Friends or Foes?

Sarah A. Riddick

Devices, Locative Media

A hand is holding up a smartphone that shows an AR-app in use. The screen looks like the camera mode is on, but there are three translucent boxes overlaid on the streetview, which show the names of three locations on a German street that have free wifi, as well as their wifi's signal strength and the walking distance to each location.

Pardon the spatial-rhetorics wordplay here, but I am increasingly getting the sense that the topic at the center of this locative media research group—augmented reality—feels simultaneously like unfamiliar and familiar territory. I have spent a substantial amount of time researching and reflecting on locative media, especially thanks to my time in Dr. Casey Boyle’s Fall 2014 course “Spatial Rhetorics and Locative Media.” There we’d often discuss the ways in which mobile technologies affect perceptions of embodiment and place, and, as

Does Augmented Reality Diminish our Humanity?

Sarah Welsh

Devices, Locative Media

Google Glass

Augmented reality, still in the nascent stages of technological development but quickly gaining traction, attempts to alter the way we interact with the world as we know it. Ideally, devices and apps that help to “augment” our reality will help us accomplish tasks that we wouldn’t be able to accomplish otherwise. The Google Glass experiment is probably one of the most famously publicized recent attempts at bringing augmented reality to the general population through wearable technology.

Introducing Our Research Areas: Devices

DWRL Staff

Devices

Image showing a small green electronic device, which powers a small light

Staffers working in the Devices research area focus on experimenting with discrete artifacts, exploring the affordances of these materials within the lab’s mission. These artifacts range from what are now considered mundane technologies (e.g., keyboards, smartphones, tablets) to 3D printers, microprocessors and microcomputers, virtual reality devices and software, and so on.