Between This and That Reality

Felipe Cruz

Locative Media

A few weeks ago, my casual walk on campus suddenly turned into a police incident. As my colleague Deb Streusand recently wrote on our blog, we have been playing an augmented reality game called Ingress. It turns the entire world into a battle between two factions trying to conquer and control portals, which are based on actual physical locations. Like her, I have found Ingress addictive. My walks from campus to home now usually take three times as long, as

2

Seeing Past the Littlefield Fountain

Keith Leisner

Locative Media

side view of the Littlefield fountain, statue. the fountain is frozen midstream.

For my first individual blog post on my research into the six Confederate statues that line UT’s South Mall — as well as my research on similar projects at the University and how they both relate to current national controversies surrounding what the Confederate flag stands for, as well, more generally, race relations in the United States – it seems appropriate to open with an article by Travis Knoll, a history PhD student at Duke University who, as an undergraduate, wrote

2

How I Became Addicted to My Research

Deb Streusand

Locative Media

Map of Europe and Asia with green and blue triangles superimposed on it, showing the locations of Ingress control fields.

I’m addicted to Augmented Reality. Specifically, my obsession comes in the form of a game called Ingress. Ingress uses the GPS in your phone to locate you in relation to landmarks called portals, which are placed at points of interest all over the world. Your primary goal as you walk around the world is to take portals from the opposing team – you can be on team “Enlightened” or team “Resistance” – and link them together to create triangular fields

5

The World, But Better

Keith Leisner

Locative Media

A composite image showing the statue of George Washington at the top of UT's south mall on an iPhone screen. The Main Tower is in the backgound.

The Augmented Reality Research Group is excited to introduce our project for the fall 2015 semester. But first of all, what is augmented reality? Commonly abbreviated AR, it is indeed just what it sounds like: taking the real world around you and enhancing it with the digital world. One of the more common applications of augmented reality is to simply overlay information from the web onto a screen through which you are looking at the real world.

1

Introducing our Fall 2015 Research Priorities: Augmented Reality

DWRL Staff

Locative Media

Google cardboard headset on a table

Our 2015 Priority in Locative Media is Augmented Reality. Mobile interfaces—including but not limited to smartphones and wearable devices—allow information and sensory experience to be layered over the physical-geographic world, mediating and supplementing users’ perceptions of ‘reality’, space, and place. Given the increased prevalence of such technologies and intense recent interest in rhetorics of space and place, such additions to the lived environment afford rich possibilities for rhetorical scholarship and instruction.

1

Introducing Our Research Areas: Locative Media

DWRL Staff

Locative Media

Image showing a large grouping of multicolored pins in a map

Locative media is spatial rhetoric’s digital turn—or, thinking spatially, the digital end of the spatial rhetorics spectrum. With the rise of location-aware technologies and media forms, online and geographic worlds have converged: our online worlds move with us through geographic space thanks to web-capable mobile devices, while ever-more fine-grained geographic data becomes an integral part of online texts and networks.