Flash Fellowships Preview: Analyzing

DWRL Staff

Flash Fellowships, Multimodal Writing

A flashbulb filled with magnesium foil,

Flash Fellowships give staffers and assistant instructors in the DWRL the time, techniques, and technical resources they need to accomplish projects related to their own research and scholarship. Assistant instructors and staffers fill out a form that helps them articulate their project’s theoretical and pedagogical rationale, and think through any resources that they’ll need to complete the project. The submission goes to a committee that gives the applicants feedback on their project and, if granted, provides the requested resources. The

Flash Fellowships Preview: Gathering

DWRL Staff

Flash Fellowships, Multimodal Writing

A small flashbulb with coiled magnesium filament.

Flash Fellowships give staffers and assistant instructors in the DWRL the time, techniques, and technical resources they need to accomplish projects related to their own research and scholarship. Assistant instructors and staffers fill out a form that helps them articulate their project’s theoretical and pedagogical rationale, and think through any resources that they’ll need to complete the project. The submission goes to a committee that gives the applicants feedback on their project and, if granted, provides the requested resources. The

Flash Fellowships Preview: Building

DWRL Staff

Flash Fellowships, Multimodal Writing

A flashbulb with magnesium filament.

Flash Fellowships give staffers and assistant instructors in the DWRL the time, techniques, and technical resources they need to accomplish projects related to their own research and scholarship. Assistant instructors and staffers fill out a form that helps them articulate their project’s theoretical and pedagogical rationale, and think through any resources that they’ll need to complete the project. The submission goes to a committee that gives the applicants feedback on their project and, if granted, provides the requested resources.The following

Wearables Lesson Plan: Yelp

Reinhard Mueller

Devices, Lesson Plans, Locative Media, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

This is a picture of the Yelp logo with a symbolic scale in the background indicating the lawsuits against Yelp. The picture is mostly in red, the scale in the background is in black. The letters and the Yelp logo are mostly in white.

Yelp is a virtual marketplace that has been shaping our spatial orientation for many years, since it was founded in 2004 and has increasingly expanded worldwide since 2009. Despite its vast impact on our daily life, its digital rhetoric has hardly been researched and is usually taken for granted without further critical awareness. In a 2013 survey, the Boston Consulting Group found that only 15% of 4,800 interviewed small business knew that they had a free Yelp profile and that

Lesson Plan: Visualizing Sound by Captioning Nonspeech Sounds

Matt Breece

Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

Although closed-captioning is usually thought of in terms of accessibility, it also highlights the larger rhetorical significance of sound—a significance which is most notably taken up in sound studies. The convergence of rhetoric with sound studies has become increasingly salient to rhetorical theory as noted in the review essay “Auscultating Again: Rhetoric and Sound Studies” from RSQ. Sound in the multimodal classroom has likewise become a relevant site for rhetorical instruction, invention, and exploration. Scholars like Cynthia Selfe, Erin Anderson,

Lesson Plan: Fake News

Marnie Ritchie

Lesson Plans, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

Weekly World News covers featuring a bat child and Hillary Clinton with an alien baby

Friedrich Nietzsche famously wrote in On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense that truth is “a movable host of metaphors, metonymies, and anthropomorphisms: in short, a sum of human relations which have been poetically and rhetorically intensified, transferred, and embellished, and which, after long usage, seem to a people to be fixed, canonical, and binding.” He likens truths to coins that have lost their embellishment. Given the complicated, contemporary industry of “fake news” (defined as news media with misleading,

Serial Exposition

Will Burdette

Multimodal Writing

Video still of stereoscope photo of crowd outside

Dr. Nathaniel Rivers of Saint Louis University gave a talk on March 22, 2017 in the DWRL. His talk built on Dr. Casey Boyle’s article “Writing and Rhetoric and/as Posthuman Practice” in College English. This video reiterates that talk. Serial Exposition from DWRL on Vimeo.

Workshop Recap: Visualizing Rhetoric with Emojis and GIFs

Mac Scott

Events, Multimodal Writing

In the DWRL’s most recent workshop, staff members looked at two of the most apparent–but perhaps most easily dismissed–exemplifications of visual rhetoric: emojis and GIFs (Graphics Interchange Format). Although we’ve all no doubt interacted with both emojis and GIFs before–whether you see them as a mildly amusing (or annoying) novelty or an essential part of how you communicate with others–we wanted to do more than glance at these visual vehicles of expression, and instead explore their affordances and limitations. Splitting

Data Visualization: Visualizing Sound Texts

Ansley Colclough

Data, Multimodal Writing

     In an upcoming lesson plan, I introduce some ways in which visualization be used to analyze elements of a literary text such as genre, theme, motifs, or plot structure. However, that lesson plan focuses predominantly on visual works. What are some of the ways in which visualization could be used to explore sound compositions, such as music?       Visualizing audio texts allows students in literature classes to convey information without requiring a background in musical theory.