Save the Date: Roundtable Interview and Lunch with Dr. Jim Brown

Sarah Noble Frank

Alumni, Events, News

The DWRL is pleased to welcome Dr. Jim Brown to campus for our first annual Alumni Network Event March 29-31, 2017. Dr. Brown is an Assistant Professor of English and the Director of the Digital Studies Center at Rutgers University. He is a 2009 alum of the Digital Writing & Research Lab. Dr. Brown conducts research in the areas of digital rhetoric, electronic literature, and software studies. His recently released book, Ethical Programs: Hospitality and the Rhetorics of Software, examines the ethical

Accessibility Project Update: Mapping Narratives of Access

Sierra Mendez

Accessibility, Locative Media, News

In the DWRL’s ongoing Accessibility project, we’ve kicked off the semester by asking: What makes a story visible or invisible? How does visibility affect accessibility? We considered whether or not popularity, or “trending,” obfuscate access to less normative narrative, and if “fake news” and “alternative facts” operate to distract from, obscure, and ultimately hide “true stories” and “real information.” This led to a broad discussion of search engines and search terms through Google Analytics to gather insight into about things

Ethical Design and Time Well Spent

Matt Breece

Accessibility, Devices

Diagonal matrix with rows and columns of mobile phones with different social media icons like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

The amount of time we spend engaged with our digital devices, especially our smart phones, doesn’t necessarily make us feel more empowered. The organization Time Well Spent argues that the reason for this isn’t some moral failing on the part of users but rather a question of intentional design: “Many people think our devices are neutral and it’s up to us to choose how to use them. But that’s not all true. Attention companies (like Snapchat, Facebook or Netflix) spend

The Rhetoric of the Digital Marketplace: Yelp

Reinhard Mueller

Locative Media, Social Media, Tools

This is the logo of Yelp, followed by the four lower case letters in black: yelp. The background is white. The logo is red.

We all did it. We all used Yelp. If you want to find out, if this Italian restaurant is in fact a good choice for Valentine’s day, Yelp has an answer. Or if you are in a new city and don’t really know which bar or coffee shop to go to, Yelp knows! Or even when you are looking for a hotel or dentist in another country, Yelp reviewers have already been there and offer advice. Today, Yelp has become

Workshop Recap: Visualizing Rhetoric with Emojis and GIFs

Mac Scott

Events, Multimodal Writing

This image is of the "nerd emoji." The emoji has a cartoon, circular barely semi-humanoid face. It's entire head is circular. It's wearing glasses, and it's mouth and eyes are agape in wonder and earnestness.

In the DWRL’s most recent workshop, staff members looked at two of the most apparent–but perhaps most easily dismissed–exemplifications of visual rhetoric: emojis and GIFs (Graphics Interchange Format). Although we’ve all no doubt interacted with both emojis and GIFs before–whether you see them as a mildly amusing (or annoying) novelty or an essential part of how you communicate with others–we wanted to do more than glance at these visual vehicles of expression, and instead explore their affordances and limitations. Splitting

Spring 2017 Speaker Series: Laurie Gries, “Doing Digital Visual Studies”

Jake Cowan

Events, News

Please join the Digital Writing & Research Lab for Dr. Laurie Gries’ lecture, “Doing Digital Visual Studies,” on Friday, February 24th, at 3pm. The talk will be held at the Texas Union Eastwoods Room (UNB 2.102). This month, the Digital Writing & Research Lab is delighted to welcome Dr. Laurie Gries from the Department of Communication at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Dr. Gries will present a talk titled “Doing Digital Visual Studies,” drawing upon her extensive work in

Invisible Knowledge

Amy Tuttle

Accessibility, Data, Devices, Digital Archiving, Locative Media, News, Pedagogy, Social Media

Screenshots show that "trump meme" is the top result.

Since you’re reading this online publication, I imagine that you, like me, leave hundreds of digital traces every day. A lot of these traces are things we can see–things like emails, texts, blog posts, twitter posts, photographs, Youtube comments, or Facebook likes. But today I’m particularly interested in the invisible, unintentional digital traces we leave–things like records of our internet searches and website visits, or the location data that logs our movements and phone calls. There’s knowledge in the invisible

Data Visualization: Visualizing Sound Texts

Ansley Colclough

Data, Multimodal Writing

     In an upcoming lesson plan, I introduce some ways in which visualization be used to analyze elements of a literary text such as genre, theme, motifs, or plot structure. However, that lesson plan focuses predominantly on visual works. What are some of the ways in which visualization could be used to explore sound compositions, such as music?       Visualizing audio texts allows students in literature classes to convey information without requiring a background in musical theory.

Machine Communication: Using and Understanding MIDI

andrewheermans

Devices, Multimodal Writing, Tools

When multi-track recording was developed in 1955, it allowed for the concept of “production” as we understand the term in contemporary music-terminology. By recording the individual elements of a performance, one could alter and edit each part of the whole composition, or start from individual parts and construct an entire composition. This not only changed the musical process, but the product as well, unlocking new and previously impossible feats of musical arrangement and production. On a smaller scale, the development