Paper Maps and Locative Media

Sarah Welsh

Locative Media

(Paper) map of Austin, 1936. Image via the Texas State Library and Archives Commission

(Paper) map of Austin, 1936. Image via the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. (Paper) map of Austin, 1936. Image via the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. People have told me that I have a good sense of direction. I attribute this to being the navigator during road trips when I was little, before there was GPS or Google or MapQuest or Yahoo Maps. Last semester, while researching augmented reality within locative media and speculating as to its future,

Talk: “Supporting the Knowledge Work of Peer Learning with Eli Review”, 3.30pm 9/28

DWRL Staff

Events, Pedagogy

Photograph of open laptop on a plain gray background. Laptop screen displays Eli Review logo and text "Bettr feedback. Better revision. Better writers."

Join the Department of Rhetoric & Writing for Prof. Bill Hart-Davidson’s talk, entitled “Supporting the Knowledge Work of Peer Learning with Eli Review”, on at 3:30pm on Wednesday, 9/28 in Parlin 104. His presentation will talk about the Eli Review, an on-line peer review and writing support tool that he helped to invent. Read the talk abstract behind the cut. Here is Prof. Hart-Davidson’s abstract: “Work on the software service Eli Review started nearly ten years ago at the WIDE

Cool Tools: The Rhetorical Methods Twine Game

J Brentlinger

Games, Pedagogy, Tools

An image of the first page of the Twine game. The image features the Digital Writing and Research Lab's logo and The University Seal.

Following the success of last year’s Twine research group, we in the DWRL wanted to take a step toward making Twine an integral part of the classroom. So during the break I set myself a goal: I wanted to write a completely new kind of Twine game. The resulting text, a Rhetorical Methods game, helps students to take a page and a half of notes regarding the issue, event, or other controversy that they choose to write about in the Rhetoric

A visit to uncanny valley

patrickschultz

Digital Archiving

This image shows a humanoid robot called Repliee Q2.

In a post last semester, we used a digital archive to create new objects by designing a little tweeting machine. This technique – using an archive to create an “intelligent” machine – is not only useful for such coding exercises or publicity stunts like the Next Rembrandt. These computational methods are also at the heart of one of Silicon Valley’s trendiest technologies: the interactive “chat bot”. Everyone does bots – short for “robots” – now: at its most recent developer conference, Facebook

Twine: The Meta Game

J Brentlinger

Games, Pedagogy, Tools

Screen Shot 2016-04-21 at 9.18.47 AM

Team Twine was busy in the spring. Kendall, Lily, and I have been hard at work making some wonderful stuff for the DWRL. To help us along, we’ve read books and articles, held meetings and brainstorming sessions, developed our own materials and shared them with each other, facilitated Game Jams for others, and even made our own games. But since the busy semester is coming to a close, I want this post to be simple. For this post, I just

Web Presence Workshop, Sept 23

DWRL Staff

Events

Flyer for web presence workshop hosted in the DWRL; stylised image of a brown-skinned woman against a purple background, with the words 'Develop your web presence'. Friday, Sept 23, 1-3pm, PAR 104

Join the Digital Writing & Research Lab for a Web Presence workshop on Friday, September 23 between 1 and 3pm in PAR 102. Whether you want to put the finer details on your existing professional website or need to start from scratch, we’ll give you the skills you need to create a professional web presence and showcase your accomplishments. If you have questions about the event or need to request accommodations, email Jake Cowan at cowan.jake@gmail.com 

Project Management Comes to the DWRL

colewehrle

Events

Students working on computers in a computer laboratory

DWRL lab members wear a lot of different hats around campus. We are students and writers. We are teachers and mentors. We help write grant proposals and serve on planning committees. But, in all things, we are project managers. This is an easy thing to forget. Neither my undergraduate nor graduate coursework offered seminars on project management. The writing process was mostly a black box, and most of the advice I got about it followed a pretty simple formula: first

To Catch ’em All, Campus Needs to be Accessible

Jake Cowan

Accessibility

One afternoon sometime in the middle of our summer, in need of a little sun—the glow of a monitor only goes so far—I picked up my laptop and headed out to the UT turtle pond to work underneath one of the shadier trees. While this spot is usually among the less crowded on our 50,000+ person campus, on that day it was bustling with more bodies than just those with shells. “Catch anything good out here?” a youngish voice asked

Accessible Data for Austin

Amy Tuttle

Accessibility, Data, Digital Archiving, Locative Media

Star Trek's Data standing in front of the Austin skyline.

The various features of built environments can allow us to access the spaces in which we conduct our everyday lives. But for some individuals, the very same features that are meant to provide access to spaces render these spaces out of reach. Barriers in public environments often prevent mobility-impaired people from being able to move and participate freely within a space. In the space of a college campus, for example, many individuals face the challenges of navigating barriers like a