Lesson Plan: Transforming Data Visualizations

Mac Scott

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

Contemporary rhetorical theory privileges a view of rhetoric as dynamic, where texts circulate both spatially and temporally to myriad effects. For instance, in her influential article “Unframing Models of Public Distribution,” Jenny Rice pushes against a view of rhetoric as contained and static, arguing instead that the “rhetorical situation is part of . . . an ongoing social flux” and that rhetorics “evolve in aparallel ways” (9, 14) as they circulate. Mary Queen, in “Transnational Feminist Rhetorics in a Digital

Lesson Plan: Visualizing and Analyzing Terministic Screens with Voyant

Matt Breece

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

When instructors teach rhetorical or textual analysis that focuses on how word choice frames arguments and how audiences might interpret texts, it often relies on a singular text with an assignment that asks students to analyze how the author’s choice of words, terms, or metaphors influence its interpretation. Yet this type of analysis is limited because it doesn’t account for how word choice excludes other words, thus affecting a text’s interpretation. As Kenneth Burke reminds us in “Terministic Screens”: “Even

“Doing Digital Visual Studies” with Laurie Gries

Matt Breece

Data, Events, Tools

Dr. Laurie Gries speaking at a lectern

As part of our spring 2017 Speaker Series, the Digital Writing & Research Lab hosted Dr. Laurie Gries, whose lecture “Doing Digital Visual Studies” reflects upon and extends the research she undertook in her award-winning book Still Life with Rhetoric: A New Materialist Approach for Visual Rhetorics. In her longitudinal study of Shepard Fairey’s “Obama Hope,” she developed a digital, visual methodology called iconographic tracking in order “to trace the circulation, transformation, and consequentiality of new media images.” Dr. Gries’s

Save the Date: Roundtable Interview and Lunch with Dr. Jim Brown

Sarah Noble Frank

Alumni, Events, News

Event information provided in body text.

The DWRL is pleased to welcome Dr. Jim Brown to campus for our first annual Alumni Network Event March 29-31, 2017. Dr. Brown is an Assistant Professor of English and the Director of the Digital Studies Center at Rutgers University. He is a 2009 alum of the Digital Writing & Research Lab. Dr. Brown conducts research in the areas of digital rhetoric, electronic literature, and software studies. His recently released book, Ethical Programs: Hospitality and the Rhetorics of Software, examines the ethical

Accessibility Project Update: Mapping Narratives of Access

Sierra Mendez

Accessibility, Locative Media, News

In the DWRL’s ongoing Accessibility project, we’ve kicked off the semester by asking: What makes a story visible or invisible? How does visibility affect accessibility? We considered whether or not popularity, or “trending,” obfuscate access to less normative narrative, and if “fake news” and “alternative facts” operate to distract from, obscure, and ultimately hide “true stories” and “real information.” This led to a broad discussion of search engines and search terms through Google Analytics to gather insight into about things

Ethical Design and Time Well Spent

Matt Breece

Accessibility, Devices

Diagonal matrix with rows and columns of mobile phones with different social media icons like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

The amount of time we spend engaged with our digital devices, especially our smart phones, doesn’t necessarily make us feel more empowered. The organization Time Well Spent argues that the reason for this isn’t some moral failing on the part of users but rather a question of intentional design: “Many people think our devices are neutral and it’s up to us to choose how to use them. But that’s not all true. Attention companies (like Snapchat, Facebook or Netflix) spend

The Rhetoric of the Digital Marketplace: Yelp

Reinhard Mueller

Locative Media, Social Media, Tools

yelp logo

We all did it. We all used Yelp. If you want to find out, if this Italian restaurant is in fact a good choice for Valentine’s day, Yelp has an answer. Or if you are in a new city and don’t really know which bar or coffee shop to go to, Yelp knows! Or even when you are looking for a hotel or dentist in another country, Yelp reviewers have already been there and offer advice. Today, Yelp has become

Workshop Recap: Visualizing Rhetoric with Emojis and GIFs

Mac Scott

Events, Multimodal Writing

In the DWRL’s most recent workshop, staff members looked at two of the most apparent–but perhaps most easily dismissed–exemplifications of visual rhetoric: emojis and GIFs (Graphics Interchange Format). Although we’ve all no doubt interacted with both emojis and GIFs before–whether you see them as a mildly amusing (or annoying) novelty or an essential part of how you communicate with others–we wanted to do more than glance at these visual vehicles of expression, and instead explore their affordances and limitations. Splitting

Spring 2017 Speaker Series: Laurie Gries, “Doing Digital Visual Studies”

Jake Cowan

Events, News

Event information provided in body text.

Please join the Digital Writing & Research Lab for Dr. Laurie Gries’ lecture, “Doing Digital Visual Studies,” on Friday, February 24th, at 3pm. The talk will be held at the Texas Union Eastwoods Room (UNB 2.102). This month, the Digital Writing & Research Lab is delighted to welcome Dr. Laurie Gries from the Department of Communication at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Dr. Gries will present a talk titled “Doing Digital Visual Studies,” drawing upon her extensive work in