(Re)visualizing Data

DWRL Staff

Assignments, Data, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy, Tools

Stylistic data visualization similar to snow on a TV screen but with no accompanying data

Team Data Visualization is proud to present a new set of lesson plans that we’ve designed to be as cohesive as the first. With a little planning, anyone can share a data visualization lesson plan with their students. Sarah Welsh and Sierra Mendez collaborated on two lesson plans. The first takes inspiration from Dr. Johanna Wolfe and her work on rhetorical numbers to help students think about the often mistaken view that numbers always equal fact. The second provides a meditation on rhetorical

Lesson Plan: Data Collection and Database Rhetorics

Sarah Welsh

Assignments, Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

Some public data makes sense , and some data does not. Not only does this have to do with the way data is presented or cherry picked, but research suggests that in order to get credible results, surveys should provide clear questions that are unambiguous, unbiased, and worded in a way that prompts respondents to answer truthfully (Dillman 2007). This might seem obvious when it’s written down as it is here, but the importance of a survey’s rhetoric may not

Cool Tools: Sound Mapping

shaherzadahmadi

Assignments, Audio Week, Locative Media, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy, Tools

Screenshot from UMapper

Jazz began in New Orleans at the turn of the century and spread like wildfire in the 1920s, as men and women who perfected the genre booked gigs in Austin, Chicago, and New York. Musicians played live for youthful audiences, electrified by the new sound. As the genre traveled north, and later west, it transformed from Louis Armstrong’s optimistic trumpet to Thelonious Monk’s volatile piano solos. How may instructors demonstrate these changes in America’s cultural landscape, capturing both the physical

Cool Tools: Piktochart

Beck Wise

Assignments, Pedagogy, Tools

Cropped screenshot from Making a Persuasive Infographic, header only

Have you thought about incorporating infographics into your classroom? Here at UT, the first year writing curriculum now includes an infographic assignment in which students are asked to remix their final persuasive essay into a visual form. The Digital Writing & Research Lab has been collaborating with the Department of Rhetoric & Writing to create an assignment prompt and tool recommendations, and given that it’s syllabus creation time around the country, we thought we’d share one of those resources with

Typographic Prosopopoeia Lesson Plan

Jake Cowan

Assignments, Lesson Plans, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

Among the many other fantastic lesson plans outlined by our DWRL colleagues for the recent Digital Pedagogy Open House, the Typography Team™ offered the following exercise as one way to integrate a rhetoric of fonts into a writing classroom. In your typical freshman comp class, instructors often observe that a student tends to give more thought to what she writes than how she writes it, and so the goal of many assignments is to have students become more aware of how the how works to persuade, paying

Assignment Spotlight: TimeMapper

Beck Wise

Assignments, Locative Media, Pedagogy, Tools

When the DWRL staff started talking about preparing digital lesson plans for new instructors teaching first year composition in our classrooms, one of the first tools we settled on was TimeMapper. This free and open-source tool allows individuals and classes to quickly and easily build timemaps: timelines with associated geodata, in which every data point is mapped to both its temporal and physical location. It’s fun and accessible, and it builds on the DWRL’s long history of research in locative

A Discussion on Discussions

Felipe Cruz

Assignments, Pedagogy, Tools

Among teachers, silence is always a concern. You assign an intriguing, provocative and controversial reading to your students, hoping for a lively discussion in the classroom, a debate which will spark new ideas and lead to the questioning of old assumptions (assuming, that is, that students have in fact done the reading). But then, one is often met with silence. What went wrong? Did the reading not resonate with the students? Did they not find it interesting? Did they not