Introducing Our Spring 2016 Research Priorities: Twine Games

DWRL Staff

Games

A simple twine configuration

In August 2014, a culture war was touched off by the success of the text-based browser game Depression Quest, which was built with an open-source text-based tool called Twine. Depression Quest, like many Twine games, contests the highly policed definition of a “videogame”; indeed, Twine has empowered a cohort of game designers—many of whom are underrepresented in mainstream gaming culture—to design and disseminate games that critique or altogether abandon the violent, corporate, masculinist, and even humanist values of predominant gamer

Introducing Our Research Areas: Games

DWRL Staff

Games

Image showing a vintage game joystick

Digital games are always laden with values: they make assumptions about players’ bodies and beliefs as well as race, gender, class, sexuality, and ability. Games invite their players to identify with these assumptions in order to succeed. But players can also resist a game’s procedural rhetorics, sometimes learning more from the resulting friction than from winning. In the Games research area, staff members consider how these frictions may represent useful sites of research and pedagogy for digital rhetoricians.