Lesson Plan: Data, Privacy and Identity on Facebook

Reinhard Mueller

Devices, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

In “Information Revelation and Internet Privacy Concerns on Social Network Sites: A Case Study of Facebook” (2009), Alyson Young and Anabel Quan-Haase argued that “despite concerns raised about the disclosure of personal information on social network sites, research has demonstrated that users continue to disclose personal information.” In recent years, Facebook has expanded greatly — both in user numbers and in their range of applications, especially those available for mobile technologies. Used on wearable devices like smartphones and smart watches,

Lesson Plan: Thyncing about Technology & Emotion

Andrew Heermans

Devices, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy, Social Media

Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) has been accepted within medical fields as an effective and safe form of treatment for depression, anxiety and insomnia. Recently, there have been multiple personal-use devices released that appropriate these neuroscientific findings and are being marketed as a way of combating stress, anxiety and insomnia that is safer and more effective than prescription medication or substance use (coffee, alcohol etc). Thync is the first such device that is wearable, portable and controlled through an iOS app,

Rhetorical Numbers: A Workshop with Dr. Joanna Wolfe

Sierra Mendez

Alumni, Data, Events, Pedagogy

A variety of colored graphs on a white background

Across public and social media, there is a tendency to treat quantitative evidence as facts that are above argument. Most students, indeed most people, tend to say things like “numbers speak for themselves” when instead they should ask, “what are these numbers being used to say and how?” The University of Texas recently hosted a lecture and workshop with Dr. Joanna Wolfe, Professor and Director of the Global Communications Center and at Carnegie-Mellon University. A graduate of UT’s Department of

Using Raugmenter to Map the 1966 Tower Shooting

Sarah Welsh

Digital Archiving, Locative Media, Multimodal Writing, News, Pedagogy, Tools

The UT Austin tower at night

If you wanted to design an augmented reality app, but didn’t have programming expertise, what would you do? Last fall, two graduate students, Felipe Cruz (now, Dr. Cruz), Keith Leisner, and Deb Streusand began working on Raugmenter in the DWRL. This tool was designed to make the augmented reality platform LayAR accessible for people who aren’t developers. The application allows users to build a tour of points of interest by entering data into a form and selecting GPS coordinates from a

Learning to Learn, Digitally

Mac Scott

Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

The image shows the intimidating, green, and translucent head of a man hovering in the air above some sort of altar in what could be a throne room. The man is shouting, and he has an enlarged cranium. Below the floating head is dense smoke. Partially encased by the smoke is a metalic scultupre with fire coming out of its sides toward the camera. At both the left and the right edges of the altar, fire erupts out of short but thick columns. The floor is black, but shiny and reflective. The back of the altar (behind the semi-transparent head) are tall narrow columns that resemble a massive church organ.

A couple years ago, I enrolled in my first digital rhetorics course. I was excited, but also insecure, certain that I was out of my league compared to my classmates, all of whom I assumed were naturals when it came to all things digital. Even though I knew this way of thinking didn’t make sense, I constructed a digital literacy binary of sorts: either you’re naturally techy, or not. A wizard born with magical powers, or not. In a sense, this

Talk: “Supporting the Knowledge Work of Peer Learning with Eli Review”, 3.30pm 9/28

DWRL Staff

Events, Pedagogy

Photograph of open laptop on a plain gray background. Laptop screen displays Eli Review logo and text "Bettr feedback. Better revision. Better writers."

Join the Department of Rhetoric & Writing for Prof. Bill Hart-Davidson’s talk, entitled “Supporting the Knowledge Work of Peer Learning with Eli Review”, on at 3:30pm on Wednesday, 9/28 in Parlin 104. His presentation will talk about the Eli Review, an on-line peer review and writing support tool that he helped to invent. Read the talk abstract behind the cut. Here is Prof. Hart-Davidson’s abstract: “Work on the software service Eli Review started nearly ten years ago at the WIDE

Cool Tools: The Rhetorical Methods Twine Game

J Brentlinger

Games, Pedagogy, Tools

An image of the first page of the Twine game. The image features the Digital Writing and Research Lab's logo and The University Seal.

Following the success of last year’s Twine research group, we in the DWRL wanted to take a step toward making Twine an integral part of the classroom. So during the break I set myself a goal: I wanted to write a completely new kind of Twine game. The resulting text, a Rhetorical Methods game, helps students to take a page and a half of notes regarding the issue, event, or other controversy that they choose to write about in the Rhetoric

Twine: The Meta Game

J Brentlinger

Games, Pedagogy, Tools

Team Twine was busy in the spring. Kendall, Lily, and I have been hard at work making some wonderful stuff for the DWRL. To help us along, we’ve read books and articles, held meetings and brainstorming sessions, developed our own materials and shared them with each other, facilitated Game Jams for others, and even made our own games. But since the busy semester is coming to a close, I want this post to be simple. For this post, I just

Re/Constructing Monopoly

Amy Tuttle

Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

The corner of a Monopoly gameboard showing the space "Boardwalk," which is a high value property in the game. The space also has a hotel on it, which indicates that it is a lucrative property. Behind the plastic, red hotel is a small metal car gamepiece.

In “Low Fidelity in High Definition: Speculations on Rhetorical Editions,” Casey Boyle presents methodological variations between critical editions and rhetorical editions. Notably, he examines how different scholars view fidelity, suggesting that traditional literary scholars tend to emphasize textual authenticity, while rhetoricians are most interested in foregrounding rhetorical effects. Specifically Boyle says, “as rhetoricians we are not as interested in what a text is as we are in what a text does” (127). Because they open spaces for conversation that can