Augmented Reality Has Arrived and It’s Ready to Be Analyzed! Well, Almost.

Sarah A. Riddick

Accessibility, Devices, Locative Media

Lately, augmented reality has been making a lot of headlines in the tech world. This week, for instance, Microsoft revealed its HoloLens, a visual headset that allows people to interact with and manipulate complex, projected visuals. In a promo for the HoloLens, a woman wearing the headset customizes a Volvo car before buying it, building it up from the nuts and bolts with gestures as simple as pressing her thumb and forefinger together. It isn’t quite the tech we see Robert

The Useful Art of Coding

Lily Zhu

Accessibility, Games, Multimodal Writing

user versus coder

By the time I finished writing this blog post, I had come to a realization that wasn’t even on my mind at the start: The active function (in as utilitarian a sense as possible) of an object is just as important in creative production as its affective and aesthetic potential.

Introducing Our Research Areas: Accessibility

DWRL Staff

Accessibility

Image showing chalk drawings of accessibility symbols on a dark background

Throughout its history, the DWRL has had a persistent commitment to accessibility. Following in the footsteps of former lab director John Slatin, who played a key role in making the Internet more accessible to people with disabilities, DWRL staffers in this research area work with a broad definition of “accessibility” as they investigate and experiment with technologies designed to make digital spaces more open, usable, and accessible.