Teaching Wearables and Metadata: An Introduction

DWRL Staff

Data, Devices, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

An image of words jumbled together, with some words emboldened and enlarged. The largest bold word is "Metadata," which is the focus of the artwork. Other words hat are large and bold include "information," "definitions," and "systems".

This semester, Team Wearables is committed to providing faculty interested in digital rhetoric and pedagogy with lesson plans that get at the heart of academic issues surrounding the proliferation of wearable devices. Our first set of lessons this semester focuses on one particularly salient issue concerning the examination of wearable technology today: metadata. Metadata isn’t a recent phenomenon. The Dewey Decimal System creates metadata so that the books, journals, and periodicals we need are easier to find in our libraries.

Lesson Plan: Wearable Tech and Metadata

J Brentlinger

Data, Devices, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

These modules introduce the importance of ‘metadata’ to undergraduate students. They create a necessary link between metadata and contemporary ‘Wearable Tech’. Understanding how metadata is created and used helps students realize the ramifications of its existence, including its influence on the process of digital writing. Learning Objectives One class period, but the lesson is modulated to fit into already existing lessons as the instructor wishes The articles listed, the link to Project ‘Seen’, a computer and smartphone None The lesson

Rhetorical Numbers: A Workshop with Dr. Joanna Wolfe

Sierra Mendez

Alumni, Data, Events, Pedagogy

A variety of colored graphs on a white background

Across public and social media, there is a tendency to treat quantitative evidence as facts that are above argument. Most students, indeed most people, tend to say things like “numbers speak for themselves” when instead they should ask, “what are these numbers being used to say and how?” The University of Texas recently hosted a lecture and workshop with Dr. Joanna Wolfe, Professor and Director of the Global Communications Center and at Carnegie-Mellon University. A graduate of UT’s Department of

Accessible Data for Austin

Amy Tuttle

Accessibility, Data, Digital Archiving, Locative Media

Star Trek's Data standing in front of the Austin skyline.

The various features of built environments can allow us to access the spaces in which we conduct our everyday lives. But for some individuals, the very same features that are meant to provide access to spaces render these spaces out of reach. Barriers in public environments often prevent mobility-impaired people from being able to move and participate freely within a space. In the space of a college campus, for example, many individuals face the challenges of navigating barriers like a

Talking Republican: Analyzing the GOP debate

Patrick Schultz

Data

Donald Trump, business man and politician, pointing at the camera while debating in Washington in 2011.

Here, we present a computational analysis of language use in the Republican debate, looking at each candidate’s rhetorical style. Donald Trump, it turns out, is a man of many, but short words; John Kasich loves asking questions; and Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz rely a lot on emotionally charged language.

Picking Software for Font Design

Katharine Hubbard

Data, Multimodal Writing

Everyday we encounter fonts and maybe some people think about them, but it doesn’t cross my mind unless the font is hard to read or when I actually design something it comes up. So why might someone design a font? To capture the spirit of their organization in a why that the current fonts do not. I chose to do it as part of my research project for the DWRL. When I agreed to design a font I thought, “How