Using Twitter as a Writing + Research Tool

As I mentioned in my last post, Twitter provides students and teachers alike the ability to locate voices that would otherwise go unheard. As promised, this lesson plan helps use Twitter to (1) help students develop a writing practice, (2) refine their arguments, and (3) use hashtags to research a topic. Here's that...

The Faith of Hashtags

You hit your name and maybe something in the whole scheme of the system gives a death rattle. For now your name is over their name, over the subway manufacturer, the Transit Authority, the city administration. Your presence is on their presence, your alias hangs over their scene. There is...

Bringing Black Feminist Twitter in the Classroom

In most intro to Rhetoric courses, students evaluate the credibility of sources wherein they're discouraged from incorporating unreliable sources into their own work. Intentional or not, this lesson tends to limit students to major media outlets (e.g., New York Times and Wall Street Journal.)  What might we risk in through this...

Studying Twitter Communities

Recently, Twitter user Aziah King posted a lengthy story via Tweets that took social media by storm. Chronicling a seemingly unbelievable weekend trip to Florida, King’s 148-Tweet epic is amazing not only for its content, but how she tells the story. Her voice—intensely personal, often hilarious, brazenly forthright—exhibits the Black discursive practice...

The ‘Fantasy’ of Participation

There’s an article that I love, because it analyzes a growing trend regarding people and their relationships with technology. Titled, Communication in online fan communities: The ethics of intimate strangers, author Christine James analyzes relationships between celebrities and paparazzi, celebrities and fans, and fans among themselves. James wants to know...