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Teaching Data Visualization: An Introduction

DWRL Staff

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

A word cloud made with the 200 most common words in this post

Team Data Visualization is proud to present a set of lesson plans that are ready to use in your classroom (networked or not). Whether you’ve been thinking about introducing a data visualization lesson of some kind, or have no idea what that would even look like or how it would fit in a writing classroom (or any classroom for that matter), we’ve got you covered. We’ve designed this set of lesson plans to be cohesive, but you can pick any

Lesson Plan: Navigating Research with Mind Maps

Sierra Mendez

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

Typically, when we think about data visualization, we think about a product–an infographic or chart that helps viewers understand and engage with complex information. Today, we’re doing something a little different and thinking about visualization as a tool for students to identify relationships and patterns in their research. We’ll start by introducing MindMup, a digital mindmapping tool, and present a basic how-to for its use. We are then going to use MindMup as a way to uncover relationships. Usually, mindmaps

Lesson Plan: Visual Literacy and Infographic (Re)Composition

Mac Scott

Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

In Multiliteracies for a Digital Age, Stuart Selber discusses the importance of pedagogy that cultivates, what he refers to as, multiliteracies, where students strive to be “users of technology . . . questioners of technology . . . producers of technology” (25). This idea of multiliteracies pushes beyond a focus on teaching students the technical functions of technology (though that still has a place) to emphasize that students also need to hone their rhetorical and critical capacities. Working with visual

Lesson Plan: Data Collection and Database Rhetorics

Sarah Welsh

Assignments, Data, Data Visualisation Week, Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

Some public data makes sense , and some data does not. Not only does this have to do with the way data is presented or cherry picked, but research suggests that in order to get credible results, surveys should provide clear questions that are unambiguous, unbiased, and worded in a way that prompts respondents to answer truthfully (Dillman 2007). This might seem obvious when it’s written down as it is here, but the importance of a survey’s rhetoric may not

Re/Constructing Monopoly

Amy Tuttle

Lesson Plans, Pedagogy

The corner of a Monopoly gameboard showing the space "Boardwalk," which is a high value property in the game. The space also has a hotel on it, which indicates that it is a lucrative property. Behind the plastic, red hotel is a small metal car gamepiece.

In “Low Fidelity in High Definition: Speculations on Rhetorical Editions,” Casey Boyle presents methodological variations between critical editions and rhetorical editions. Notably, he examines how different scholars view fidelity, suggesting that traditional literary scholars tend to emphasize textual authenticity, while rhetoricians are most interested in foregrounding rhetorical effects. Specifically Boyle says, “as rhetoricians we are not as interested in what a text is as we are in what a text does” (127). Because they open spaces for conversation that can

Lesson Plan: Using Twitter for Research

J Brentlinger

Lesson Plans, Pedagogy, Social Media

Last semester I worked with the DWRL, as well as undergraduate students Chioma Nwosu, Eliza Marks, Kayla Marks, and Jazmyn Griffin, to develop a short podcast describing the research value of Twitter. It centered on searching Twitter for quotes by using the hashtag function, and covered some of the issues that emerge when searching for controversial topics. To start off this semester, I’ve bundled the pod with a lesson plan meant to help instructors talk about Twitter’s academic virtues!

Typographic Prosopopoeia Lesson Plan

Jake Cowan

Assignments, Lesson Plans, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy

Among the many other fantastic lesson plans outlined by our DWRL colleagues for the recent Digital Pedagogy Open House, the Typography Team™ offered the following exercise as one way to integrate a rhetoric of fonts into a writing classroom. In your typical freshman comp class, instructors often observe that a student tends to give more thought to what she writes than how she writes it, and so the goal of many assignments is to have students become more aware of how the how works to persuade, paying