Accessibility Project Update: Mapping Narratives of Access

Sierra Mendez

Accessibility, Locative Media, News

In the DWRL’s ongoing Accessibility project, we’ve kicked off the semester by asking: What makes a story visible or invisible? How does visibility affect accessibility? We considered whether or not popularity, or “trending,” obfuscate access to less normative narrative, and if “fake news” and “alternative facts” operate to distract from, obscure, and ultimately hide “true stories” and “real information.” This led to a broad discussion of search engines and search terms through Google Analytics to gather insight into about things

The Rhetoric of the Digital Marketplace: Yelp

Reinhard Mueller

Locative Media, Social Media, Tools

This is the logo of Yelp, followed by the four lower case letters in black: yelp. The background is white. The logo is red.

We all did it. We all used Yelp. If you want to find out, if this Italian restaurant is in fact a good choice for Valentine’s day, Yelp has an answer. Or if you are in a new city and don’t really know which bar or coffee shop to go to, Yelp knows! Or even when you are looking for a hotel or dentist in another country, Yelp reviewers have already been there and offer advice. Today, Yelp has become

Invisible Knowledge

Amy Tuttle

Accessibility, Data, Devices, Digital Archiving, Locative Media, News, Pedagogy, Social Media

Screenshots show that "trump meme" is the top result.

Since you’re reading this online publication, I imagine that you, like me, leave hundreds of digital traces every day. A lot of these traces are things we can see–things like emails, texts, blog posts, twitter posts, photographs, Youtube comments, or Facebook likes. But today I’m particularly interested in the invisible, unintentional digital traces we leave–things like records of our internet searches and website visits, or the location data that logs our movements and phone calls. There’s knowledge in the invisible

Visualizing Data with Google Maps

DWRL Staff

Accessibility, Data, Data Visualisation Week, Digital Archiving, Locative Media

A picture of a map of an unidentified space with a large red pin marker stuck in the center of the map's area.

Visualization: Sierra Mendez. Text: Amy Tuttle. It’s hard to believe that at one time, map ownership was a privilege reserved for the wealthiest members of a society. But thanks to modern surveying techniques and satellite systems, highly precise maps are widely available on the internet. As a result of this ubiquity, maps have become absolutely critical in many fields of human endeavor. With a few clicks of a mouse, Google Maps will allow you to explore the earth, the moon,

Cool Tools: Sound Mapping

shaherzadahmadi

Assignments, Audio Week, Locative Media, Multimodal Writing, Pedagogy, Tools

Screenshot from UMapper

Jazz began in New Orleans at the turn of the century and spread like wildfire in the 1920s, as men and women who perfected the genre booked gigs in Austin, Chicago, and New York. Musicians played live for youthful audiences, electrified by the new sound. As the genre traveled north, and later west, it transformed from Louis Armstrong’s optimistic trumpet to Thelonious Monk’s volatile piano solos. How may instructors demonstrate these changes in America’s cultural landscape, capturing both the physical

Using Raugmenter to Map the 1966 Tower Shooting

Sarah Welsh

Digital Archiving, Locative Media, Multimodal Writing, News, Pedagogy, Tools

The UT Austin tower at night

If you wanted to design an augmented reality app, but didn’t have programming expertise, what would you do? Last fall, two graduate students, Felipe Cruz (now, Dr. Cruz), Keith Leisner, and Deb Streusand began working on Raugmenter in the DWRL. This tool was designed to make the augmented reality platform LayAR accessible for people who aren’t developers. The application allows users to build a tour of points of interest by entering data into a form and selecting GPS coordinates from a

Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality and Future Reality, Oh My!

Sarah A. Riddick

Locative Media

In an earlier post I discussed some of the difficulties we face in understanding augmented reality as a result of its many conflicting definitions. Fortunately, these definitions generally agree on a few elements: technology, mediation, interactive experiences, combining the non-digital and the digital. Unfortunately, just when we might feel like we’re able to comfortably describe augmented reality to anyone who asks, we’re confronted with another issue. How is augmented reality any different than virtual reality? Instead of attempting to provide any

Paper Maps and Locative Media

Sarah Welsh

Locative Media

(Paper) map of Austin, 1936. Image via the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. (Paper) map of Austin, 1936. Image via the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. People have told me that I have a good sense of direction. I attribute this to being the navigator during road trips when I was little, before there was GPS or Google or MapQuest or Yahoo Maps. Last semester, while researching augmented reality within locative media and speculating as to its future,

Accessible Data for Austin

Amy Tuttle

Accessibility, Data, Digital Archiving, Locative Media

Star Trek's Data standing in front of the Austin skyline.

The various features of built environments can allow us to access the spaces in which we conduct our everyday lives. But for some individuals, the very same features that are meant to provide access to spaces render these spaces out of reach. Barriers in public environments often prevent mobility-impaired people from being able to move and participate freely within a space. In the space of a college campus, for example, many individuals face the challenges of navigating barriers like a